6th annual blood drive comes to SHS

Sterling High School completed its sixth annual Red Cross blood drive this year on Sept. 15.

Approximately 30 Sterling High School students participate each year. This year 42 people participated, but only 35 of those could actually donate.

Senior Tabitha Frederick donates blood Sept. 15 during the 6th annual blood drive at Sterling High School.

Senior Tabitha Frederick donates blood Sept. 15 during the 6th annual blood drive at Sterling High School.

FACS teacher Carol Prather advised students in this effort all the six years a blood drive has been held at SHS.

The blood drive began when Prather was contacted by the Red Cross.

The Red Cross provides 15,000 units of blood to Kansas hospitals daily for uses such as traumas, heart surgeries, joint replacements, organ transplants, premature babies, leukemia and cancer treatment. Each unit consists of one pint.  Of the blood donated, 20 percent comes from high school students.

Prather said it is important to donate blood because just one individual can save another’s life.  In fact, one donation can potentially save three lives.

Your blood consists of red cells, platelets and plasma. Once you donate blood, they take that blood and process it. In some cases there might be people that only need red cells or platelets or plasma. After they process it, they might separate the blood if they have people that are in need of those particular thigs. People who donate should have a nutritious breakfast and hydrated. Students need high levels of iron in their systems.

“Eating Oreos can help increase iron levels,” Prather said. Anyone can donate blood as long as they meet certain age, physical and health requirements. For more information concerning these requirements, please visit www.redcross.org.

Students can personally benefit from their blood donations to the Red Cross.  A $250 college scholarship is available to students who give 35-70 units in one year.

“All in all, the Red Cross is always very pleased with our students’ respect and behavior,” Prather said.